Category Archives: Beer

Micro-view: Revolution Brewing Cross Of Gold Golden Ale

I have a bunch of posts queued from America and now the UK ones are building up too. This isn’t for any reason other than that I’ve been getting distracted by the socializing and the exploring that comes with being in new places. So here we go; I’ll post a few of them as I get the chance.

While in Chicago several weeks back, I used the opportunity to grab a bunch of locally brewed craft beers and stop in to a few of the breweries and bars in town. One of the beers I picked up was this golden ale, done by Revolution Brewing, a brewery I hadn’t heard of, but clearly had to try. This ale was the only of their range on sale at the store, or perhaps it was the only one of their range left; Chicagoans seemed to have raided the shelves fairly thoroughly.

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The beer pours with a light, white, foamy head, with delicate lacing. With a mild hoppy aroma, it smells fresh, a little fruity, and a touch piney. The hops hit the palette a lot stronger; this refreshing ale has a light fizzy carbonation that dances on the tip of your tongue, while the sharp, hoppy citrus hits the rest of your olfactories. At first I thought it might be a little young – I sensed a little of that sour green apple flavour – but it works well with the hops to yield a light, refreshing, sessionable ale. Ratebeer rates this at 83/100, and that seems about reasonable. I can see why this might be a favourite to many.

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Science in Brewing – A response to A Good Beer Blog’s recent post

The following is a response to a recent blog post by a fellow beer blog. Details can be found below.

Woah there, brewers. Woah.
Put down those ledgers and sensors. Stop using those algorithms. That fancy book learnin’ aint helping nobody.

“Timings, temperatures and volumes… I can’t be doing that… couldn’t be arsed. At all.”

We like our beer how it is, and aint nobody gonna try and improve brewhouse efficiency on our watch. Aint nobody gonna show those big brewers using adjuncts and chemicals that they could actually produce a decent beer if a bit more research was to be done on the ingredients.

“Yet, we have to cope with knowledge and science and stuff like that. But does beer need any more of it? Really?”

Screw yeast development – why bother breeding a species to give more desirable traits? My grandpappy bred horses and dogs back in his day, but that was a legitimate form of artificial evolution, not like this fancy-pants genetically modified stuff. Why bother improving the metabolic processes of yeast when it already does a good enough job? I like my improvements to be made incredibly slowly and clumsily, instead of with precision and expertise.

No. I’d love to see more science in brewing. I’d love to see the macros embrace a higher quality product, not just in terms of a consistent, premium (shudder) product, but one that doesn’t need to be served ice cold to stomach. I’d love to see the craft breweries be able to use yeasts that maximise efficiency so that maybe the reduced overheads can offset the ludicrous taxes they’re already paying.

I’ll admit, I’m completely biased here. I am studying biotechnology, and planning to do my masters in brewing science, particularly in yeast development. But I’m doing this because of the world of possibilities available to geneticists and food scientists. Beer is great, and you won’t hear me saying otherwise, but there’s still plenty of distance yet to cover. There’s still so much to improve. What about speeding up the uptake and metabolism of those pesky compounds that currently requires breweries to spend so much time and money in the lagering stage? What about developing yeasts that will reliably produce a certain ester profile to match a recipe?

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Yeast is a far more complex critter than many people give it credit for, and there’s still plenty to learn about improving its use.

Jason Silva says it best when he says “now we have software that writes its own hardware!”, and this is the perfect way to look at it. Yeast is the powerhouse of brewing, and we’re now developing the tools to be able to manipulate it into doing exactly what we want. Why limit ourselves to ancient hardware, when a little more research and an increased adoption of scientific thinking could give us the tools to make the whole brewing process more efficient, more reliable, and more interesting. We’re already able to make animals glow, and have microbes synthesise medicines – why not extend that creativity and ingenuity to something we can really enjoy.

J.

A Good Beer Blog is really quite a good beer blog, and I’ve been a subscriber for quite some time now. The post I’m responding to is here. Check it out and subscribe.

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Lagunitas India Pale Ale

 

When I was putting together my list of breweries to visit or at least sample the wares of during my stay in America, Lagunitas was one of the first on my list. I’d had the pleasure of tasting a few of their beers back in Melbourne – the Red Ale was great, and the Little Sumpin’ Sumpin’ was simply superb – so I was super excited to see their IPA stocked in quite a few party stores around Michigan.

I first tried it from a 330mL bottle, sitting in front of a lake with the sun overhead. I’d already had a couple of pale ales, warming up for the big hit of malt and hops IPAs always deliver. Trouble was, when I did taste it, I was underwhelmed. It wasn’t the big IPA I was expecting. This time, I grabbed a larger bottle and made sure to keep my palate fresh.

The beer pours a deep copper colour, with a cream-coloured foamy head and delicate lacing. Deep and mildly turbid, it does look impressive. The label boasts 43 different hop varieties and 65 different malts. Yep, that’s right.

I’ll admit, I’m excited to try it again.

The nose is almost sickly sweet and rich – the overwhelming, almost painful sweetness many homebrewers might recognise – but it is so goddamn smooth that it still remains inviting. It’s a little too difficult to pick anything out other than hints of pine, apricot, and citrus. And of course the malt. Heavy, smooth malt notes take the forefront and singe the sinuses.

Carbonation is low and mouthfeel is medium. It immediately feels like a different beer to the Lagunitas IPA I had two weeks ago. Rich, fruity, and malty, with a zingy back-palette. The lingering bitterness suggests more than the 45.6 IBUs listed on the bottle, but this is perfectly matched with malt.

By now the head has almost completely disappeared, and it is starting to desensitise my tastebuds. I still have over half my glass to go, and I’m losing pace. At such a low IBU value, and a not un-modest 6.2% alc, I would have assumed it would be slightly more sessionable, but no. Even the Tactical Nuclear Penguin kept me wanting more for longer.

Overall, this is a beer that tastes wonderful, demonstrates excellence in brewing and checks every box, but ultimately a pint is all I could drink. Well worth trying, especially the 330mL varieties.

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Micro-view: Dogfish Head Imperial 90 Minute IPA

Well, it’s pretty much perfect.

Smooth, fruity, aromatic, fresh hops. Sweet, balanced, caramel malt. Impeccably hidden 9% alcohol content. Ideal mouthfeel and carbonation. The box claims that it’s “probably the best IPA in America”, and I’d extend that to the world.

9% and sessionable. Well played, Dogfish Head.

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If I haven’t sold you, check out this 100/100 it’s gotten on Ratebeer.

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Micro-view: Samuel Smith’s Imperial Stout

I picked this up from a party store after remembering how good the Samuel Smith Oatmeal Stout was last time I had it, and for $4.80 it was an offer I couldn’t refuse.

The beer pours as an imperial stout should – thick, black, with a creamy-brown, foamy head and a decent spattering of lacing. Rich chocolate notes and roasted malts billow off the nose, with rich esters that suggest a high alcohol content. This clocks in at a moderate 7% ABV however, so I wasn’t too worried about ending a night of lager, hopfen weiss, and catching up on the footy with something titled ‘imperial’.

Mouthfeel is thick, low in carbonation, and feels like sucking down motor oil, albeit sweet, raisin-soaked motor oil. The beer features a well-balanced palette of rich chocolate malt, roasted malt, rich estery stone fruits, and a decent dose of bittering hops to carry the stout home.

I’m not sure I prefer it to their oatmeal stout, though there’s every possibility that I’m looking at the oatmeal through rose-coloured glasses. That said, for something so rich, high in gravity, and thick, it’s going down surprisingly well. Similar stouts have been just a little too sweet, or just a little too thick, but this verges on sessionable (a dangerous proposal, perhaps).

For $5 a pint I rate this as something everyone should try, if only to try a great example of a stout. I doubt how imperial it is, but it is good.

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Micro-view: Rogue Northwestern Ale

An afternoon of beer! What a wonderful thought! Before I indulge in the consumption of a keg of beer some friends are organising, I thought I’d treat my palate to another bottle of Rogue.

I’d been putting this one off for a rainy day – literally, it’s been far to hot to appreciate beers with body – so today is the day.

It pours dark amber/red, with a fluffy brown head and thick lacing. The ale is far more turbid than the Orange Honey Ale I had the other day, and looks mighty more substantial.

A pleasant hint of sweet malt and caramel on the nose, and a touch of piny, fruity hops. Upon tasting, I was reminded of Cooper’s heavier beers, but the distinctive Pacman yeast that Rogue loves is there also. The taste is big resin-y hops (yep, there’s Amarillo in there) balanced with caramel and chocolate malt.

A lively carbonation keeps this big, flavoursome beer fresh and drinkable. A roasted malt bitterness lingers and urges you to take another sip.

At 6.2% alc, it makes for a great special release (not that it’s in limited supply, every Meijer, Walmart, and Kroger I’ve been to seem to stock it) and is definitely worth a try. I wouldn’t class it as sessionable, but it would go down a treat with food.

 

 

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Micro-view: Goose Island Summertime

This one is a light, refreshing, tasty Kölsch-style ale from Chicago’s Goose Island Brewing.

Very sessionable, while retaining plenty of flavour, and a nice depth. Malty with citrus notes. Mild late bitterness is all that lingers. Low carb for easy drinking and a decent 5% abv.

Winner.

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Rogue Summer Orange Honey Ale

I’m in America.
Many of you already know that, and the rest of you were going to find out when I posted all my excitedly typed notes on the brewery visits, beers, and festivals I’ve enjoyed in the month since I’ve been here. But I’ve been too busy having fun to knuckle down and produce anything up until now, when I decided it was time to start drinking and reviewing the ever-increasing collection of beers lining the walls and insides of my fridge.

So to start the Beer Tour de USA, I’ll review a brew from one of my favourite breweries, Rogue Ales.

Rogue Summer Honey Ale

As I sit down to begin cooking the evening meal (butter chicken tonight, I think), on a 35+ degree day, it strikes me that I need a refreshing beverage to tide me over. Not the shameful half block of PBR, but a quality craft beer. Enter Rogue’s Summer Orange Honey Ale.

This little beauty pours as clean as a over-filtered macro, has about as much head retention, and has a suspicious straw/off-amber colour that could leave it mistaken for any “premium” lager, but it is better than it looks.

It sports a fresh, citrusy aroma, with plenty of sweet malt and a mild hop character. Upon tasting, the main adjective that comes to mind is ‘zesty’. It bears less resemblance to the Rogue Ales I’m used to and seems like a dilute homemade citrus cordial (or dilute American lemonade). It is low enough in carbonation to just add enough bite to add to the citrus element, without making it feel like a beer.

I can see why the RateBeer community might rate it 43/100, but I don’t agree. On tap, I would happily pick this as a session beer, and it suited my requirements on this hot day perfectly. Its mild, yet attractive flavour doesn’t overpower or shock the tastebuds, but it has enough of everything to please.

The label boasts coriander and chamomile, but I don’t find either of these to be especially indistinguishable. Rather, a barely detectable spiciness underlies what hop bitterness there is (and at 10 IBUs, that’s not a lot).

I found it discount at my local party store (yep, ‘Murica calls a spade a spade and sells alcohol and snacks in one convenient location), and for a few bucks, this sessionable 5% alc brew does exactly what it aims to.

 

NB: Recently, Sudsavant posted a really great review and comparison of both the Rogue Ales’ Double Dead Guy Ale and Stone’s Double Bastard. For my two cents, I love the Dead Guy ale, but found the Arrogant Bastard to be, well, a little arrogant. The Dead Guy was a really palatable ale, while half a sixer of Bastards are still sitting in my fridge, purely because there is an abundance of more attractive beers on offer. That said, I haven’t had the Double Bastard yet, and it’s been a year or two since I tried the Double Dead Guy, so I’m thinking I might have to do a comparative review myself. I also have a good 50+ beers in my fridge to review, and notes from a large handful of Michigan breweries to post in the coming weeks, so watch this space.

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The Case Of The Forlorn Beer Geek

Here be an iPhone case

This, my friends, is an iPhone case. Not just any iPhone case, but one adorned with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the yeast behind everyone’s favourite carbonated, malt-based beverage. I threw this together the other day because the site, Redbubble, was having a sale and I needed a new case. Not content with the cases available (they had zero beer geek cases, despite having thousands of other geeky cases), I made my own. I’m not sure if I’ll expand this into a set, but I have been considering a hops design. It all depends on whether people show interest or not. If you’re interested, head over to the site and click ‘buy’.

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This Post, A Placeholder

Having realised my lapse in regular updates I thought I would at the very least jump on and check in with what’s going on with me and with the blog.

It’s great to see the the blog is getting plenty of hits, even after months and months of inactivity. I must admit, I didn’t know whether what I was posting was incredibly relevant – it’s easy to get very bored reading beer review after beer review. What I’ve found though is that people are still getting to the site by googling particular beers. I guess if you see something on a shelf and don’t whether to buy it, a quick search doesn’t hurt. So yeah, contrary to my own previous beliefs, people do want craft beer reviews. I’ll make sure to start posting those from now on.

I also enjoyed seeing that the Communist Drinking Game post is still the number one attraction to the blog. Over 60% of all page views are of that post, and it comes up regularly in search term reports. I guess people love the novelty. I just hope you’re all drinking responsibly. (And by responsibly, I mean craft beer.)

In a couple of weeks I’ll be hearing back about an application I submitted to study abroad in Chicago. That plan is to head over in July and try every US craft beer I can get my hands on, while still acing my microbiology and bioinformatics (shudder) classes. I daresay a lot of this will be posted here on the blog, including a trip to the Great American Beer Festival in Denver. I seriously cannot wait. I was hoping to build a checklist of American beers and breweries to taste and visit while I’m there, so if anyone wants to hit me up on Twitter or leave a comment with your favourite US beers, bars and breweries, that’d be great. Also, if anyone can recommend a good coffee place in Chicago, that’d be good too. I am from Melbourne, after all.

I’m also thinking about posting some stuff on my home brew, as it’s getting to the stage where I’m finding it hard to fault, and I’m my own worst critic. Brewhouse efficiency is >85% and all the flavours are coming through just as planned. Carbonation is easy as, now that I’m kegging, and I’m slowly scaling up my yeast lab. Guess I’ll post a couple of my favourite recipes and you guys can let me know what you think. I might also be building a randall into my kegerator, but I’m still in the planning stages at the moment.

So yeah, I’m feeling invigorated as the ball is starting to roll faster and faster. Watch this space and I’ll do my best to get back into the rhythm of posting.

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